MOCA OPENS NEW FALL EXHIBITION INTERIOR LIVES: PHOTOGRAPHS OF CHINESE AMERICANS IN THE 1980'S BY BUD GLICK

[New York, NY] September 19, 2018 — The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA)’s Fall 2018 exhibition Interior Lives: Photographs of Chinese Americans in the 1980s by Bud Glick, on view from October 18, 2018 to March 24, 2019, is the largest exhibition of acclaimed photographer Bud Glick’s work documenting everyday life in New York City’s Chinatown in the 1980s. It is organized in conjunction with the Museum of the City of New York (MCNY) exhibition Interior Lives: Contemporary Photographs of Chinese New Yorkers.

 

Interior Lives: Photographs of Chinese Americans in the 1980s by Bud Glick will reflect on how Manhattan’s Chinatown has changed, progressed, and evolved since MOCA’s founding in 1980 when the Museum, then known as the New York Chinatown History Project, began to document the experiences of Chinatown residents whose way of life was changing or disappearing altogether amid socioeconomic shifts in New York City.

 

For three years beginning in 1981, Bud Glick was commissioned by MOCA to photograph the street life, people, and domestic scenes of Chinatown. He earned the trust of Chinatown residents and gained access to interior lives during a pivotal time when new waves of immigrants from Hong Kong, Taiwan, and China began to converge into Chinatown, altering the demographic landscape of what was then home to earlier migrations and the largest ethnic Chinese population outside of Asia.


Interior Lives: Photographs of Chinese Americans in the 1980s by Bud Glick is the most comprehensive exhibition to date of Glick’s photos - some of which have never been seen before by the public - taken during those pivotal three years.

 

The exhibition weaves multimedia into its presentation to connect past and present using audio oral histories that Glick and MOCA have recently recorded with individuals who were the subjects of Glick’s photos more than 30 years ago. These oral histories will be presented throughout the exhibition and, through MOCA’s newly launched Cantonese and Mandarin audio guides on the Museum website, enable Museum visitors to hear first-person accounts of life in 1980s Chinatown and their thoughts on present-day anxieties over housing, development, and immigration.

 

“Bud Glick’s 1980s photographs of New York City’s Chinatown is a significant body of work at a critical time. Only as a retrospective can one begin to grapple with the power of immigration, the transformation of space, and the subtleties of community. By combining Bud Glick’s photographs with oral histories, this exhibition presents a rich contextualization of a complex time when much of the global Chinese diaspora viewed New York City’s Chinatown as its north star. MOCA’s presentation provides the rare opportunity to consider the evolution of a community — New York City’s Chinatown — allowing visitors to examine a community over a 40 year period,” said Nancy Yao Maasbach, President of the Museum of Chinese in America. “We are pleased to present this exhibition with MCNY to re-ignite conversations about what the experiences of Chinatown residents can contribute to the broader discussion about community, space, and perseverance.”


“I am grateful to MOCA for giving me the opportunity 38 years ago to embark on this journey and connect intimately with so many people in Chinatown. This project allows me to live out my responsibility to the people who welcomed me into their lives,” said Bud Glick. “I see this exhibition as a continuation of that journey where I hope more and more people will connect to the stories told in these photos. I am especially glad that the photos are being exhibited at MOCA, where they belong and belong to all.”


Herb Tam, MOCA’s Curator and Director of Exhibitions, says: “Bud Glick’s photographs of the Chinese community in the 1980s poignantly capture what is usually taken for granted: the everyday moments at work, home, and on the streets that make up a community’s culture. He documented a changing Chinatown as much with his heart and soul as with his eye.”

This exhibition is organized by the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) in conjunction with the Museum of the City of New York exhibition Interior Lives: Contemporary Photographs of Chinese New Yorkers, on view from October 26, 2018 through March 24, 2019, featuring the work of three photographers — Thomas Holton, Annie Ling, and An Rong Xu.

 

“With more than half a million people of Chinese descent living in Manhattan’s Chinatown and other neighborhoods across the city,” said Whitney Donhauser, Ronay Menschel Director of the Museum of the City of New York, “New York is home to the largest ethnic Chinese population outside of Asia. We’re honored to join MOCA in offering an intimate look into a significant community full of vastly diverse experiences.”

 

Interior Lives: Photographs of Chinese Americans in the 1980s by Bud Glick is curated by Herb Tam, MOCA’s Curator and Director of Exhibitions. It was supported by research from Alice Vo, curatorial intern.

 

For photos of the exhibition and from the VIP Reception, visit the following link: https://bit.ly/2OPDQ65.

 

About Bud Glick
Robert “Bud” Glick has been a documentary and commercial photographer for nearly 40 years. Born in Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin, he received his B.A. from the University of Wisconsin. He earned an MFA in Photography from Brooklyn College in 1983. He has taught as an adjunct professor in the art departments of Brooklyn College, Queens College, C.W. Post and William Patterson University. In addition to his work in New York City’s Chinatown from 1981 to 1984, Mr. Glick’s documentary photography includes work done in the Latino Community of Milwaukee, a small town in Sicily, Nicaragua, and a Bronx-based nonprofit assisting individuals living in poverty.

 

Additional Programs
During the run of the exhibition, MOCA will offer a series of related events, public programs, family programs, walking tours and gallery tours.

 

For updates on upcoming related programs, visit MOCA’s website at www.mocanyc.org, follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @mocanyc, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/mocanyc.


Interior Lives: Photographs of Chinese Americans in the 1980s by Bud Glick and related programs are made possible with the generous support of the Robert Chinn Foundation, the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature and by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. Additional support provided by Mannar Wong, and Joyce Yu and Edward Lai.

 

About Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA)
The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) aims to engage audiences in an ongoing and historical dialogue, in which people of all backgrounds are able to see American history through a critical perspective, to reflect on their own experiences, and to make meaningful connections between: the past and the present, the global and the local, themselves and others.

 

Hours:
Monday – Closed
Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday – 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Thursday – 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
MOCA Free First Thursdays: Free gallery admission on the first Thursday of each month, made possible through the generosity of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and J.T. Tai & Co. Foundation.

 

Admission:
General Admission: $10
Seniors (65+ with ID) and Students (with school ID): $7
Children under 2 years old: Free
MOCA Members: Free