MOCAREADS Chinese Mexicans and the Shaping of a Mexican National Identity

Thu, May 25, 2017 @ 6:30pm - 8:30pm

Tickets (include museum admission): $10/adult; $5/student & senior; Free for MOCA members

Click here to purchase tickets

 

In MOCA’s core exhibition, With a Single Step: Stories in the Making of America, you’ll find a poem that begins with:


Detained in this wooden house for several tens of days,
It is all because of the Mexican Exclusion Law which implicates me.

It's a pity heroes have no way of exercising their prowess.

 

It is one of over 135 poems that were carved on the wooden barrack walls by Chinese immigrants detained at San Francisco’s Angel Island Immigration Station (1910-1940). In fact, Angel Island was also used as a detention facility for transients to and from Cuba, Mexico, and other Latin American countries. In 1921 the Mexican government banned the immigration of Chinese labor into Mexico.

 

Island book cover

Please join us for a conversation with Jason Chang, author of Chino: Anti-Chinese Racism in Mexico, 1880-1940 as he sheds light on antichinismo--the politics of racism against Chinese Mexicans and delves into the untold story of how antichinismo helped the revolutionary Mexican state, and the elite in control of it, build their nation.

 

 

Judy Yung

Jason Oliver Chang is Assistant Professor of History and Asian American Studies at the University of Connecticut, Storrs. At UConn he is an affiliated faculty member with the Institute of Latino, Caribbean, and Latin American Studies and the Associate Director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute. In 2010 Jason earned his PhD in Comparative Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Chino: Anti-Chinese Racism in Mexico, 1880-1940 with University of Illinois Press and co-author of Asian America: A Primary Source Reader with Yale University Press. He has published articles in the Journal for Asian American Studies, the Pacific Historical Review, and the Journal of Asian American Studies, the Pacific Historical Review, and the Journal of Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures in the Americas. Jason's current work rewrites Asian American history from the perspective of Chinese, South Asian and Filipino sailors to think how racial formations work at sea.